The Harsh Reality

28
Mar

The Harsh Reality

Blogging, it’s used to share what’s on our minds. Sometimes we will laugh, sometimes we will ponder, sometimes we will learn, sometimes we will…mourn. Today I blog with a heavy heart. I’m not sharing this story to depress, but rather encourage you down the remediation path in order to prevent the outcome that my family has endured. This week Sunday we received the news that my cousin with aspergers was admitted to a mental institution due to psychotic symptoms. The next day he attempted suicide while on suicide watch and he was most likely successful. Today he lays in the hospital in critical condition, little to no brain activity, fevers spiking, seizures etc… His body is giving out, he has given up.

I hurt as a cousin to see him live a life that was so hard, that eventually lead him to the point where life no longer seemed important. I hurt as an RDI consultant knowing that I could have offered more to him, but accept the reality that I can’t help everyone and they weren’t asking me for support. Without the invitation to help, there was nothing I could do to make his life easier.

For the families that have decided on the remediation route, keep up the hard work. Continue this path of removing these obstacles from your child’s life. Our goal is to provide a good quality of life for individuals with autism – to live a full and rewarding life. For those of you reading this who haven’t decided to join the remediation path, I encourage you more now to consider this as an option. Often we hear the comment, “my child isn’t that bad, he’s high functioning.” My cousin had asperger’s and wasn’t even diagnosed until he was in his 20’s. He wasn’t “that bad”, yet his quality of life was poor. This didn’t have to be the outcome for him.

On a more postitive note, I dedicate myself even more to the families that I work with, knowing that I can walk them down the remediation path. I strive to do all I can to prevent this outcome for others and instead to improve the quality of life for the entire family. I am so glad that remediation is now an option! I had the wonderful opportunity to cry with a family today over the joy of how much progress their son has made and how much their quality of life has imporved as a family. What a priceless moment and one that I needed at a time like this!

Until next week and even more fired up about remediation,
Michelle

Comments

  • Marni
    March 28, 2007

    So sorry to hear about your cousin. You’re right, we have to work hard to try to help our children so there is not even a shadow of such thoughts in their minds. It’s frustrating when you know something out there (read RDI) works, and so many people haven’t come on board and are just struggling and lamenting their situation. Best.

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